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133 Centre Avenue, Topton, PA

Ray A. Master Post 217

 

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Reading VA Clinic 

Ridgeview Professional Center

2762 Century Boulevard

Wyomissing, PA 19610

484-220-2572

Call 1-800-409-8771 for appointment

Hours: Monday - Friday 7:30 am - 4 pm

Parent Facility:   Lebanon VAMC
             Phone:  (717) 272-6621 or 1- (800) 409-8771

 

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HEALTH CARE FOR VIETNAM VETS

 

THE NEWS HERE IS THAT VETS CAN APPLY AND RECEIVE VA HEALTHCARE SYSTEM BENEFITS (AT THE LEAST – CATEGORY 6) WITHOUT MEANS TESTING REQUIREMENTS  -  THIS IS BIG NEWS!

 

ATTENTION: SEE THE MESSAGE BELOW FOR DETAILS, BUT IF YOU HAVE A VIETNAM CAMPAIGN RIBBON/MEDAL ON YOUR DD-214, YOU CAN CALL THE DEPARTMENT VISO CHAIRMAN @ 404-828-5257 FOR ENROLLMENT.

Every Vietnam Veteran needs to be enrolled in VA Healthcare.  The Affordable Healthcare Act or OBAMACARE will start on January 1, 2014 and VA Healthcare is acceptable as current insurance.

All Vietnam Veterans with Service Medal (VSM), Vietnam Campaign Ribbon (VCM) will now qualify for VA Healthcare coverage as Category-6 recipients regardless of disability rating or report of income.

Enroll at any VA Facility.  You will need to bring an original or a certified copy of your DD-214 and complete form 101-EZ, have a valid / current picture I.D. with you and take all to your nearest VA clinic or hospital to receive your VA Health Card and be assigned a primary Health Care Doctor.

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Oct. 13, 2009

 

VA Extends “Agent Orange” Benefits to

More Veterans

 

Parkinson’s Disease, B Cell Leukemia & Ischemic Heart Disease

WASHINGTON –Relying on an independent study by the Institute of Medicine (IOM), Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric K. Shinseki decided to establish a service-connection for Vietnam Veterans with three specific illnesses based on the latest evidence of an association with the herbicides referred to Agent Orange.

 

The illnesses affected by the recent decision are B cell leukemias, such as hairy cell leukemia; Parkinson’s disease; and ischemic heart disease.

 

Used in Vietnam to defoliate trees and remove concealment for the enemy, Agent Orange left a legacy of suffering and disability that continues to the present.  Between January 1965 and April 1970, an estimated 2.6 million military personnel who served in Vietnam were potentially exposed to sprayed Agent Orange.

 

In practical terms, Veterans who served in Vietnam during the war and who have a “presumed” illness don’t have to prove an association between their illnesses and their military service.  This “presumption” simplifies and speeds up the application process for benefits.

 

The Secretary’s decision brings to 15 the number of presumed illnesses recognized by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). 

 

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Vietnam Veterans' Children


NAUS was recently contacted by an organization called Birth Defect Research for Children. It reports that for many years of collected data on Vietnam veterans’ children with birth defects have identified a pattern that seems unique to the children of veterans who served in Vietnam.  Its research is conducted through the National Birth Defect Registry, a project developed through a collaboration of seven prominent scientists.  Recently, a communication from Harold Zenick, Ph.D., EPA Director to the Registry commented, “Your birth defects registry is the type of effort needed to make linkages between environmental exposures and birth defects.”

The organization has put out a call for additional data to increase the research on the linkage between Agent Orange and birth defects in Vietnam veterans’ children. 

We encourage those who have been affected to submit an application on the Birth Research website at http://www.birthdefects.org/registry/

 

 

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